New Project: Standing Lesson

The other day I came across a study suggesting that sitting is not only totally bad for my health (I knew that), but that – contrary to common assumptions – doing sports for compensation would not prevent the bad results from sitting around the whole day. Amongst the health issues caused by excessive sitting are increased risk for depression, overweight, heart attacks, problems with the back and muscles, and the only way to stop the negative side effects of sitting is NOT sitting. I find that really interesting, as some people seem to delude themselves by thinking that running a marathon in their late 40ies would compensate for years of sitting in meetings, planes, offices, living rooms and restaurants. Having a job with much office work myself, I really wonder whether I can change the habbit of sitting.

Now that I deleted my social media life – which changed absolutely nothing, isn’t that sad? – I need a new project. So, I am going to see how much I sit. When I’m not teaching I suppose I make it to 12 hours on my butt. I’ll see whether I can reduce it to less than 5 hours (7 is the daily average for Germans, 9,6 hours for office workers).

What are your experiences? How much do you sit, and did you ever consider it a cause for your health issues?

Cheers, Nae73

My new life

Isn’t it amazing what you get done once you stop living digital and go back to real lfe? I have been without Twitter in the first place, and a number of email newsletters for about a week now. I went out with friends, had an appointment with my fitness trainer to reschedule my workouts, and I have redecorated my home office. It turns into a sleeping room, and I found this gorgeous turquoise water photo as wallpaper. Now I am living in a construction area, because I still wait for the new carpet to be delivered. I hope I will receive it today, because I need some space to go back to working. And I have not posted anything ūüôā

My social media diet¬†works out quite well, although I’m still on Facebook. The main reason for that is that I run a professional Facebook page and it takes them 2 weeks to close it. While I wait to confirm my request I become more and more aware what pointless discussions I lead there, with people I quite like but never meet in person. I have some 100 friends on FB, but was invited to only four birthday parties in the past 12 months. And that was a 300% increase compared to 2012!

What happens to birthday parties when you get older? In my 20ies I was constantly partying. In my 30ies, then, I was constantly under stress: had a family, went back to university, my social life did no longer exist – one of the reasons why I embraced social media happily: at least you feel like you are connected. It takes a while to realise that in fact it’s a weak substitute. Of my 100 and a few Facebook¬†friends I deleted 30 last week. Not one of them called or emailed me. And I don’t mind. Had they deleted me, I also would not have realised it.

Anyway, birthday parties: do you celebrate getting older? 

Cheers, Nae73

I did it

Bye bye, Twitter! I will miss you.

Actually, once you started it gets easier. Should I go cold turkey instead of deleting one by one?

I have a professional account I may keep, because I paid a year in advance. And yes, I am aware that this is the same argument any addict might use: I’ve paid the Bourbon, I can’t waste it…

Thankfully, I am not trying to let go of alcohol, meat, or sex. Have you seen this challenge set up by Tim Ferris? He is mental, he is!

Cheers, Nae73

Where can I close this?

Most providers make it dead easy to join their online stores and communities, and then usually don’t care about you. But try withdrawal! Suddenly, they feel like talking. If you find the ‘delete my account’ button at all. Today I tried leaving one shop¬†– a nice one, actually, where you can sell your old books, games, etc., but I have just bought new bookshelves ūüôā – and one loyalty programme.¬†

Loyalty programme? Oh, that is a marketing tool supposed to encourage you to buy in preferred stores.¬†E.g., they provide you with a card to collect ‘points’ when you shop in affiliated stores, promising completely useless gifts in return for your points – often enough simply a discount when you buy stuff you don’t need just so you don’t lose your heavily earned points. Of course you never earn enough points to get to the interesting – but still useless – rewards. In return you allow the provider to evaluate your buying behaviour so that they can enhance your shopping exprience.

Meaning: encouraging you to come back and spend more money. Now, there’s nothing wrong with doing marketing¬†and trying to make more money; but when it comes to loyalty programmes you must be aware that what you do is: you work for the store (by providing your data willingly) and in return are allowed to buy more of their stuff. Part of my evaluation ceremony for my online accounts therefore is: Do I make someone elses job here? And am I getting out as much as I put in? Loyalty programmes are a Yes for question 1, and a No for question 2; so I get rid of them.

You wish. I’m still waiting for their helpline to get back to me, because it is impossible to find out how to close my account apart from the universally accepted written notice via mail. But I can’t help myself but thinking that if joining didn’t cost a dime, I should not have to pay the postman for withdrawing either.

Awaiting further information. Have agreat day! Nae73